Arch Problems: Too High or Too Low

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When it comes to your arches, we at Gentle Professional Foot Care are reminded of the classic story of the Goldilocks and the Three Bears—too high or too low are both problematic. Your arches need to be “just right” to ensure that you walk, run, jump and stand pain free.

Your foot is responsible for carrying the weight of your whole body. The arch is an integral part of this work, distributing the weight within your foot in a way that enables you to stand and walk without pain. When something disrupts the correct functioning of your arch, then problems arise.

Cavus Foot—this is the name of the condition of having an arch that is too high. If your arch is overly raised, it puts an excessive amount of pressure on the ball of your foot, your toes and your heel. This can result in instability and pain, as well as secondary conditions such as hammertoes, claw toes, calluses and corns. 

Flat Feet—an arch that is partially or completely collapsed can also cause pain but it will more likely be in the arch, ankle, shin, knee, hip or lower back. 

Compensating for Arch Issues

Arch issues can have a variety of causes, including biomechanical defects, genetics or overuse issues. If you suspect a foot problem that is connected to your arch, the first step is to have our podiatrist, Dr. Charles A. Suleskey, examine your foot. The foot doctor will want to observe your arch both when you are sitting and standing and may also want to take a look at the wear pattern of your shoes which can provide clues to the biomechanical workings of your foot. Once the podiatrist has determined the type of arch issue you have and its cause, a treatment plan can be developed to help compensate for an arch that is too high or too low. This may include, among other options:

  • Shoe modification—footwear choice can impact arch problems, helping provide arch support and cushioning and providing stability. The foot doctor can advise you on the best styles for your situation. 
  • Orthotic devices—custom inserts for your shoes can redirect your weight away from painful areas and offer arch support.
  • Maintaining a healthy weight—excess weight puts additional strain on your feet, particularly your arches.

Each situation is unique and the foot doctor will know best how to compensate or correct your particular arch issue. If you have concerns about your arch or are experiencing foot pain that you cannot explain, contact our Venice office by calling: (941) 493-7999.